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PoP podcast episode 100_2

When you’re in the midst of a professional shift it can feel impossible to make sense of your message, let alone consistently produce content to share with others. So how do you show up authentically and intentionally when your identity feels like a moving target?

Contrary to what you may have heard, you don’t have to share every piece of this transition. And what a relief that is.

In this milestone episode (1-0-0!) I’m talking about:

  • The differences between you view your brand and how others perceive it,
  • When you should make an announcement about changes and when that’s not necessary,
  • 5 tips to help you move through this phase without ghosting your followers, and
  • Getting past the resistance of putting yourself out there after pivoting your professional direction.

TOP TAKEAWAYS

  • You get to tell people who you are.
  • An identity crisis is simply realizing your way of being and working isn’t vibrant, enjoyable, or life-giving.
  • A simple and effective way to reintroduce your new direction is to change the way you introduce yourself.
  • The pressure to perform and share everything inhibits our creativity, making it impossible to see what we really want.
  • Just because someone else is doing what you want to do doesn’t mean you shouldn’t do it.
  • A big plan starts with small steps—start with what’s on your mind today.

KIM WENSEL QUOTED

"It’s not enough to enjoy something. There has to be a strategic purpose behind it. Otherwise it’s a hobby."

"Authenticity doesn’t mean sharing everything you’re going through when you’re going through it."

"There’s not a more uncomfortable place to be as a business owner than to see where you want to be and not have your brand and message align with that."

"We play tug of war with where we’ve been and where we’re going because we don’t trust that where we’re going is where we need to be."

"The mistake that we make is that everything needs to be a huge announcement—the big plan that we have for the future needs to be implemented all at one time."